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Cape Town Stadium
Cape Town, Western Cape

CAPE TOWN STADIUM CONSORTIUM: Architect

Date:2009
Type:Stadium
Status:Extant


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33°54'14.81" S 18°24'38.65" E
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Cape Town Stadium was designed by FIFA World Cup stadium specialists GMP ARGITEKTEN with local firms LOUIS KAROL ASSOCIATES, COMRIE WILKINSON ARCHITECTS AND URBAN DESIGNERS (Cape), JAKUPA ARCHITECTS & URBAN DESIGNERS, PARAGON ARCHITECTS and MUNNIK VISSER ARCHITECTS, with OVP LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS responsible fro the landscaping. The project cost R4.3billion and was built specifically for the 2010 FIFA World Cup. It hosted the opening game of the tournament. The stadium set against the backdrop of table mountain was one of the iconic images of the tournament. The site was reportedly handpicked by the President of FIFA, Sepp Blatter.

It was built under very onerous and restrictive environmental impact conditions which according to the city added about R800 million to the cost. These included a lowered maximum height and crowd noise emission limits. The combination of these led to a flatter lower slung tension cable roof entailing higher stress forces. Glass was used on the roof to limit sound transmission and as ballast to resist wind uplift forces.

The stadium is located within a highly successful greater urban design precinct which connects into a fan walk connected into the city and the very popular green point park.

The capacity of 65,000 was reduced with the removal of temporary seating to 55,000. Since the World Cup utilisation has been thin. In 2012 the city was in negotiations with the owners of Newlands Stadium regarding a plan to move rugby from Newlands to Cape Town Stadium. A major hurdle is the construction of around 200 additional seats in the new venue.

(Mike BELL 2012)

All truncated references not fully cited below are those of Joanna Walker's original text and cited in full in the 'Bibliography' entry of the Lexicon.