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Union House
Johannesburg, Gauteng

STUCKE and HARRISON: Architect
EMLEY and WILLIAMSON: Architect

Date:1928
Type:Offices
Status:Unknown
Street:Main St

Cumming George 1933

UNION HOUSE is a concrete framed building rendered in stucco and its boldly designed facades with their vigorous detail together with the successful corner treatment make it amply worthy of the prominent stand it occupies in the city's business centre.

Of the building's eight floors, the ground floor was arranged for subdivision into suites of offices to suit tenants' requirements, while the upper floors were all arranged as on the typical floor plan illustrated. Features of note are the generous area of the light wells, the ample strong-room accommodation on all floors, and the spaciousness of the corridors and public lobbies.

The interior finishings are on sound modern lines and everywhere bear evidence that the Architects have expended with careful thought the fruits of their wide experience of this important side of modern commercial buildings. The object of combining economy in maintenance with attractive appearance has been successfully achieved.

Serving the eight floors are two gearless traction passenger lifts travelling at 400 feet (121.92 meters) per minute and arranged for Duplex collective automatic control with bronze doors and fronts at the ground floor, the whole installation being the most modern available and typical of the architects' discerning choice in all items of technical equipment.

(SAB Jan 1930:31 ill; Stucke exhib cat no 21)

All truncated references not fully cited below are those of Joanna Walker's original text and cited in full in the 'Bibliography' entry of the Lexicon.


Writings about this entry

Cumming-George, L. 1933. Architecture in South Africa - Volume One. Cape Town: The Speciality Press of S.A. Ltd.. pg 57
van der Waal, Gerhard-Mark. 1987. From Mining Camp to Metropolis - The buildings of Johannesburg 1886-1940. Pretoria: Human Sciences Research Council. pg 199 ill