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St Paul's Church
Rondebosch, Cape Town, Western Cape

Sophia Wharton Myddleton (Sophy) GRAY: Architect
PENKETH and CALVERT: Architect
William WHITE: Architect

Date:1849 : 1854 : 1880
Type:Church
Style:Kent Style
Status:Extant


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33°57'42.30" S 18°28'10.06" E Alt: 20m
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The first church on this site was built by Major Charles C MICHELL. The land on which this church building was erected was granted by Sir Lowry Cole on 30 August 1832 and the church was opened on 16 February 1834. In 1848 Bishop Gray was invited to a meeting to consider extensions to the church. He submitted designs which were accepted. These are believed to be modifications by Sophia GRAY of a design by BUTTERFIELD. The foundation stone was laid on 20 February 1849. In 1852 it was decided to discontinue work on the bell tower until adequate funding was found. In June 1854 architects PENKETH & CALVERT were brought in to complete the church. In 1880 MICHELL’s church was demolished to make way for the new stone chancel designed by London architect William WHITE. In 1936 a vestry was added to mark the centenary of the church (see foundation stone above).

Charles MICHELL is commemorated by a stained glass memorial coat-of-arms in a window in the nave of the church.

All truncated references not fully cited below are those of Joanna Walker's original text and cited in full in the 'Bibliography' entry of the Lexicon.


Writings about this entry

Greig, Doreen. 1971. A Guide to Architecture in South Africa. Cape Town: Howard Timmins. pg 216
Martin, Desmond. 2005. The Bishop's churches. Cape Town: Struik. pg 14-15
Menache, Philippe & David, Darryl Earl. 2012. A Platteland Pilgrimage : 102 country churches of South Africa . South Africa: Booktown Richmond Press. pg 12
Radford, D. 1979. The architecture of the Western Cape, 1838 1901. A study of the impact of Victorian aesthetics and technology on South African architecture. Johannesburg: Unpublished Ph.D thesis. Dept of Arch. University of the Witwatersrand. pg 199