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CORDEAUX, Herbert John Charles

Born: 1866
Died: 1923

Architect



List of Projects

Currently and disappointingly nothing is yet known of Cordeaux's origins nor of his training. He was first recorded in 1889 in the Orange Free state, responsible for the design of the tower of the Dutch Reformed Church at Edenburg. In 1890 he advertised as an architect and in 1891 entered, without success, the competition for the design of the Bloemfontein Club. In the same year he was appointed by the PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT as overseer of the construction of the teacher's residence in Edenburg. According to Schoeman (1982:107), Cordeaux worked in Bloemfontein until 1905. However, in 1893 a competition was held for the design of the East London town hall and was won, according to documentation in the East London Museum, by E PAGE. This formed the basis for the later partnership between Page and Cordeaux in East London (1898-c1904) (cf PAGE & CORDEAUX). Meanwhile Cordeaux appears to have gone where he could find work: in 1897 he was listed in Johannesburg, his address being at the Royal Chambers. By 1904 he had worked briefly with LK WALKER (CORDEAUX & WALKER). The East London Red Book (1906:270) lists him on his own in East London. In 1912 he and JWH FARROW entered into partnership in East London (cf CORDEAUX & FARROW). Cordeaux died suddenly in 1923. He was a member of the East London Civic Association. His FRIBA nomination papers have gone astray.

FRIBA 1905. (Brown 1969; East London Museum 1989; East London directorate of cultural and environmental services 1989; East London Red Book 1906; Longland's Jhb & SAR dir 1897; RIBA Jnl 1923-4:318 obit; SAB Dec 1923:31 death notice; Schoeman 1982:105, 107; SAB Dec 1923:31 death notice)

He is listed as a Past Master of the FreemasonsBuffalo Lodge in East London in 1907.

[William MARTINSON, January 2011]

All truncated references not fully cited in 'References' are those of Joanna Walker's original text and cited in full in the 'Bibliography' entry of the Lexicon.