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List of Projects

TULLY, WATERS, CLELAND and PENTLAND-SMITH

Established: 1908?

Architect


The partnership between TULLY, WATERS, CLELAND & PENTLAND-SMITH was short but successful. The first record of collaboration was in the competition for the new Post Office in Pretoria, when in September 1908 the competition, hitherto restricted to Transvaal architects only, was opened up to the whole country by popular demand. Forms for the competition were applied for in the name of Tully & Waters and were to be sent to them in Cape Town c/o a hardware store. A business card inscribed Tully, Waters & Cleland exists in the Cleland papers at the HSRC, the address being 'Parker's Bldgs, Cape Town and Johannesburg'. The partners won an honourable mention in this competition (the winner being AJ STEWART) but the designs for the building were subsequently reassessed, by a committee organised by Pretoria Town Council, who decided that the work be carried out according to the plans of COOK & MacKENZIE and to the elevations of Tully, Waters & Cleland.

With the further collaboration of J PENTLAND-SMITH, they won the competition for the Natal University College in 1910; Pentland-Smith seems to have been the only one of them resident in Natal at the time. Here the competition had run into difficulties; only 16 sets of drawings were submitted, possibly because of the boycott of the competition by architects called because the PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, who had drawn up the rules, declared that the best design would be chosen for execution by the Department, a ruling which angered the architects as it rendered the winner helpless regarding supervision. The authorities changed their minds and Tully was in charge of the supervision, his previous experience doubtless in his favour.

(Hillebrand 1975; Hillebrand 1986; NAD PWD; Natal University College Commemorative Brochure 1912)

All truncated references not fully cited in 'References' are those of Joanna Walker's original text and cited in full in the 'Bibliography' entry of the Lexicon.