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TALLO, Gabor

Born: 1910 02 11
Died: 1978 12 26

Architect

SACA:
Reg No: 705
Year registered: 1938

Was born Gabor Steiglitz in Breznobanya in Slovakia (then part of Hungary) but trained in Vienna at the High School of Arts and Crafts and received two years of University training (1929-32), five years in all. He then practised on his own account for four years, working (1932-5) for GC Nicoli, an architect in Genoa and spending some time in Budapest where he changed his name. In Budapest he made the layout and designed new accommodation for the Royal Hungarian Institute for Child Psychology (1936). He came to South Africa in 1936/1937 and sat the special qualifying examination at the University of the Witwatersrand in 1937. By 1938 he was working in Johannesburg. At some point (n.d.) he left Johannesburg for Cape Town where he entered partnership with A HONIKMAN (HONIKMAN & TALLO) but left for Britain in 1958 at the invitation of the Camphill-Rudolf Steiner movement, to design buildings to fit the needs of children taught through the Camphill-Rudolph Steiner methods. In 1959 his office was in Harley Street in London although the headquarters of the organisation appear to have been at Bieldside in Aberdeenshire. He died in Britain.

(ISAA mem list; ISAA Ybk 1938-39)

All truncated references not fully cited in 'References' are those of Joanna Walker's original text and cited in full in the 'Bibliography' entry of the Lexicon.

Books citing TALLO

ISAA. 1959. The Yearbook of the Institute of South African Architects and Chapter of SA Quantity Surveyors 1958-1959 : Die Jaarboek van die Instituut van Suid-Afrikaanse Argitekte en Tak van Suid-Afrikaanse Bourekenaars 1958-1959. Johannesburg: ISAA. pp 97, 211

ISAA. 1969. The Yearbook of the Institute of South African Architects and Chapter of SA Quantity Surveyors 1968-1969 : Die Jaarboek van die Instituut van Suid-Afrikaanse Argitekte en Tak van Suid-Afrikaanse Bourekenaars 1968-1969. Johannesburg: ISAA. pp 101, 175